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Tailson

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About Tailson

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    Surgeon
  • Birthday 18/12/1989

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  1. Oh my god that's extremely high praise from people I respect so much. :-: Mechanics aside, I feel like lawed synthetics sort of "know their lot", whereas IPCs don't seem to have that same thing to them. I'm aware owned IPCs exist, of course, but they always struck me as a group trying to find their place in a world that might not want them. I think the key difference is that: Their outlook on who they are and where they belong.
  2. I was hedging on the luck and chance bit, maybe the result of a small trash avalanche (trashalanche) jostling it around enough to start it up/knock it out of standby mode. I understand the likelihood of that is terribly low, which I feel adds a little bittersweet luck to and otherwise extremely unlucky robot.
  3. BYOND Key: Tailson Character Names: Rex Winters, Kere'Selsh Qorina, Byron Reichard, Margaret Stainforth, Harmony, Brunton, PocketBuddy 2.0, Giselle Royce, Geraldine Schofield, Henry Weeter Species you are applying to play: IPC What color do you plan on making your first alien character: Exempt! Have you read our lore section's page on this species?: Back to front. Please provide well articulated answers to the following questions in a paragraph format. One paragraph minimum per question. Why do you wish to play this specific race: (One paragraph minimum) It's probably clear to most people that I thoroughly enjoy playing synthetic characters, Harmony, Brunton and PocketBuddy 2.0 making up a considerable amount of my total time playing on Aurora. I get the feeling that due to my frequency playing synthetic characters it was never considered that I wouldn't have the synth whitelist. Uh, well, surprise! I've always been happy to play stationbounds and AIs over IPCs due to me lacking a fun and convincing concept for an IPC character that I would enjoy playing on station. With me getting the Deputy position I've gone and devoted the time and energy to making that IPC character, something that I've been threatening to do for a long time. Identify what makes role-playing this species different than role-playing a Human: Renewed suspicion due to the SLF arc has, I assume, made playing IPC something of a sordid affair. There's always going to be people who adore their synthetic coworkers, but with that extra hackle-raising experience, especially for characters who were already quite hardline against synthetics, it's probably reinforced their negative views. This is actually something I've always enjoyed about roleplaying synthetics. Not that I have a thing or anything but being treated as a second class citizen (albeit a very helpful one) always seemed to fit being a robot. Mechanics! Big chonky metal, clompy-stompy feet, telly-face, heat management, different dietary needs, and so forth. Whenever I've played my other synth characters, I've enjoyed playing up the mechanical differences as a quirk of the character's personality. There's nothing quite like bullshitting some technical jargon instead of saying "my leg hurts (or at least it would hurt, if I had the capacity to feel pain. Which I don't, but my programming tells me to be personable and personify myself I will)". I'm aware how different mechanics between stationbounds and IPCs are, though perhaps not to the same depth that a player of IPCs would. Looking forward to getting hands on with that. Character Name: Essen Please provide a short backstory for this character Most people wake up to the shrill beeping of their alarm, well aware of their desire to ignore it because they have to go to work. Essen was not so lucky. Woken it was, but by the grinding sound of metal and rust below the treads of a junkyard loading vehicle. No apprehension of the impending work day, no desire to stay in bed, no memory of much at all, sadly. An abandoned mind in an obsolete frame. The first few days for the poor nameless thing were spent wandering its new home, ducking from the large machines that roamed the scrapyard. Before long, it would find itself on the streets, away from the crashing of iron, and now into the care of a group of likeminded fellows living in the slums and alleyways of Mendell City. Life on the streets of the city wasn't particularly easy. Where its companions would steal food, the IPC would scavenge batteries, sneak into buildings to charge, whatever else it took to survive. It was from these companions that Essen learnt the way things are done, giving the thing a skewed view of the world. It was a child from this group of vagrants that eventually gave Essen their name. Right there, on a plate, faded and scratched away from time and neglect, were the letters: S/N. Though not particularly lawful people, but good nontheless, with a strong sense of community and cameraderie. This had the unusual effect of giving Essen the impression that the impoverished and downtrodden were good, helpful, friendly, and those with plenty were cruel, facetious. Unaware, of course, why exactly the IPC was always the first into buildings, the first to make a move... The first to get caught. Given the chance between decommissioning or working back the debt accrued from crimes both real and falsified, Essen has been signed on to work with NanoTrasen as part of its rehabilitation, until such a time that the great debt is deemed paid. What do you like about this character? Sad homeless robot. A once-coyed machine with a strange set of morals and a kinship with people of lower social standing seems interesting to me, since most IPCs are generally owned either by themselves, or by someone many times wealthier than they are. A robot coming from a background of homelessness and petty crime, missing its old family, perhaps unaware it was the fallguy all along strikes me as a fun dynamic. Learning about how the world works outside of the alleys and gutters of the society it "grew up" in. Everyone roots for the underdog. How would you rate your role-playing ability? I usually put 7/10 here because it seems like a decent mix between confidence and humility, but I've been playing for how many years now and haven't ever had a complaint about my roleplay ability so I'm going to say 9/10 because confidence is a drug I just won't quit. Notes: I know I said that I never really felt the desire to play IPC at the beginning of this app, but this character idea has been in my head for nearly a year now so clearly that's not entirely true.
  4. I had to ask, too. Yeah, they sound neat, kinda wish I was around to see them to be honest. Sounds like we're on the same page.
  5. Hi Niennab! I have to say, I miiiiight have started playing/gotten properly involved after they were removed, I don't know what they used to be like! I think maybe I'm a collaborator. I'm happy to bounce ideas around and get to work on projects with someone else. Any project that I start will probably see a lot of feedback because that's how I work, generally. As you outlined it, I'm really happy with what you have so far. It's a good way to work. On that note, what sort of things would you be looking for from a deputy? You say you don't expect deputies to take on projects (though obviously it would be nice), what would be your ideal deputy be?
  6. Oh my goodness Doxx that is incredibly high praise. Onto the questions! My favourite is the Martian borg project. Thousands of people signing up voluntarily during the big Martian project, then the resulting mega scrapyards that dominate entire districts of the red planet. That Wall-E feel with the scrap mountains and canyons. Just the visual aspect of that must be astounding. We often mutter about free synthetic societies, how many shanty towns filled with scrapped cyborgs and IPCs do you think are out there? My least favourite is a more difficult question to answer. I'm actually not too happy with the AI for every situation thing. When I say that, I mean a lot of people take it as read that getting an AI for a facility/business/home is a fairly trivial matter. I can't see it written down anywhere in lore, so I suppose this doesn't count, but I also don't see it written down that it should be prohibitively expensive for anyone but a large, profitable company to get one brought in. I feel it downplays the potential power (and potential power NEEDS) of a stationary AI. I really struggled with the last part of that question. I'm very happy with synthetic lore from where I am, rather than applying to fix anything I'm here to expand on new ideas and fine-tune. I actually really like the idea of the hivebots as an enigmatic enemy, if my little essay wasn't hint enough at that. At the moment (recent buffs notwithstanding) they're like a random event not too different from carp. The potential for a hive intelligence becoming an actual problem is great, and I'd love to play with that idea some more. Who built them? Why do they do what they do? Questions questions. Only ever actually interacted with one glinty member of this faction IC, so it took a bit of prodding for me to look into it and realise that, yes, it's a full faction! With a history! I actually like Golden Deep. I think they're interesting and they fold into the Purpose lore quite well. They're your classic greedy space merchants and they're proud of showing that off. Getting turfed out by business rivals and feeling like a pariah when you move away from the collective is also really interesting (probably my favourite bit). I'd love to see this faction get a little more love - I feel like there's a lot of potential to bring it into the limelight. Also, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-COG4YTn6M
  7. Ckey/BYOND Username: Tailson Position Being Applied For: Synthetic Deputy Lore developer Past Experiences/Knowledge: I was admin for a while! Perhaps a little more pertinent to the application; I play AI and cyborg extensively. As a result I kinda hang on synthetic lore pretty tight. Examples of Past Work: I've helped run a few synth events while Kyres was loredev; I played the big Hephaestus escapee station-building robot who made friends, I was one of the Bubbles (core 2 is best) during the Bubble launch event, I played a Lance operative during the Ceres Lance/SLF events. Also, a few other smatterings of assistance lent while I was admin - spawning things ahead of events and such. Additional Comments: I wrote a short document going into some detail regarding hivebots. I like the idea of a replicating war machine. Sorry for the brevity of this application, I'm not sure how much you want me to elaborate on certain aspects, so I suppose it's best to wait for questions. Leave any feedback on the short hivebot thing and the drivel I've written in this post, and any questions I would be happy to answer!
  8. Oh absolutely. In the case of a malf hack, the terminals are damaged beyond repair, just straight up overloaded with no way of unfrying them.
  9. I'll address the third point first and work backwards because that's the kind of horrible person I am. The terminals' purpose in lore is to lock down the AI and restrict it. By disabling these terminals you unlock powers for the AI. Really what you're doing is disabling safeguards that are probably there for a very good reason. Yeah private places is fine. Either way it's all good. And the idea is that during malf these terminals can be hacked, it'll just take a very long time. The incentive is there to encourage malf players to coerce other players into disabling them. Borgs interacting would be possible, maybe being able to snip a wire to speed up a hack, rather than straight up disabling them.
  10. Disclaimer: I am not a smart man and I'm basically spitballing. Abstract: Reworking how AI interacts with--or can be interacted with--by crew. At the moment, the AI exists quite separate from crew, with every part of it existing in hidden compartments and a whole vault-lite setup at the back of the hardest-to-breach part of the station (not counting tcomms, of course). As a result, physical interaction or tampering is limited to either getting into the core, or building an AI upload console and slapping a fancy card against it. Whichever way a wayward traitor well-meaning crewmember with lofty ideals decides to do it, there are only two real ways to mess with the AI besides just breaking it. Either way, it’s simple. SO The Changes No more centralised law console. Well, that’s not strictly true. It’s still there, but it’s no longer possible to just slap a card against it and win. Why? Because it’s important and it has failsafes. These failsafes come in the form of several terminals around the station. They can be hidden in maintenance, installed in important locations like the Captain’s office/RD’s office, or can be in surprisingly prominent places such as a main corridor/cargo lobby. What’s important is that these are randomised. The purpose of each one is locking down an aspect of the AI. The AI will know where each of these failsafe consoles are (in notes, perhaps) but won’t know what each console does exactly, only that it limits their control over the station in some way. Let’s say Urist McTraitor would like to change the laws of our AI, BIGLAD. This will require access to a law upload console as usual, and will require them to disable several safeguard terminals. An emagged terminal will short out, rendering it useless. Even if the round is not malf, removing these safeguards can unlock malf-lite abilities. Changing alert levels, restoring and upgrading cameras, overclocking borgs, etc. Once enough safeguards are lowered, it’s possible to change BIGLAD’s laws. It doesn’t even need to be all of them. Urist can give their fancy new AI pal more malf-lite abilities by disabling more safeguard terminals. How Does This Affect Malf? I’m glad you asked, sport! Terminals are still in for malf. Instead of removing terminals granting malf-lite powers, it unlocks malf-maxi powers. Which is… The normal malf abilities. The intricacies are as such: The malf will be able to hack these terminals itself to disable them. It will take a very long time. The malf is therefore encouraged to get someone else to do it for them. Do they lie? Do they trick people? Do they threaten someone with a borg? Do they hack an IPC? The possibilities are endless Otherwise, malf isn’t affected much. It’s still possible to unlock all abilities over time. Could This Be a Force… For Good? Absolutely! Have you ever been at work and you were attacked by, let’s say, mercenaries? Or ALIENS? Poor BIGLAD with its normal lawset and limited control over the station would be almost powerless to assist, watching helplessly as its precious crew are slaughtered by cultists/xenomorphs/admins. Cue Urist McJoker and his plucky AI-guided crawl through maintenance to disable safeguards to save everyone. It’s not unheard of to remove laws or change them to help an AI stop a threat, though it is very rare. During cult, BIGLAD would be entirely unable to inflict harm on a cultist thanks to the pesky fact that they’re still technically crew. A lawchange is normally enough to fix that, but their ability to actually make any meaningful impact even then is limited. So, In Summary: X number of randomly-placed terminals around the station Disabling them reduces lawset-protection and unlocks malf or malf-lite powers for AIs Crew have a bigger hand in dictating an AI’s involvement in a crisis AI must interact with crew and can now present opportunities for trickery and other such nice suggestions to help it out, malf or otherwise Like I said at the beginning, this has just been an idea I've been throwing around with myself for a while in an effort to drive more interaction between crew and AI. As an AI main, it gets very lonely in the core and I want friends. As with any idea you don't bounce off others, there are gaps where it can be improved and places that are blatantly a terrible idea but I can't see it. Hit me with your best shot. Bonus disclaimer: How do I code. I'm just an ideas guy. Thanks for coming to my TED Talk.
  11. I think maybe a part of them still believes that they haven't wasted time and there's something new to learn. By coming to work with NT instead of where they just were, they are moving on, albeit not moving very far. Still having that curious outlook, which is part of the species as you say, but going in with extremely low expectations. The hope that it'll be different is still there, they can't shake that, they just aren't expecting a whole lot before having to move on again. Like a last hurrah, final attempt at these humans sort of thing.
  12. Depressed is the closest term I think, maybe? Maybe not depressed, but just given up. They're not about to start moping and sulking, but they don't expect anything worthwhile to come out of interacting with humans any longer. Yet they still stick around? Maybe out of a sense of duty or a kind of stubbornness that prevents them from going back.
  13. Hi @Neinbox! Thanks for responding. I had a lot of fun writing this character and coming up with the concept, which genuinely did start with a name brainstorming session and the implications of Moulded by low Expectations just spoke to me. I had planned to play Moulded as a defeated specimen. Just 100% done with the humans they are now stuck with. Whatever passion for learning and socialising with these creatures died along with the eighth office plant next to the receptionist's desk she couldn't, or wouldn't, care for. Maybe in the future they find people that they can enjoy being around, maybe they rekindle their desire to actually learn about humanity again. But really, that long in a toxic office environment has ruined them. Let's say that it's unlikely they revert back to that bubbly collection of inquisitive minds ever again.
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